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Retired Inspired

10 TIPS FOR A HEART-HEALTHY SUMMER

Wednesday, July 29, 2015 -- Summer can bring many happy memories — family vacations, summer camp, days at the water, staying up late and watching the sun set. No matter what your summer traditions include, be sure to keep in mind your heart and brain health throughout the longer daylight hours. According to the American Heart Association | American Stroke Association, heart disease and stroke remain the No. 1 and No. 5 causes of death in the U.S., yet 80 percent of these diseases are preventable with simple lifestyle modifications.

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TIPS FOR A SATISFYING RETIREMENT

Friday, July 10, 2015 — Perhaps you’re reading this article because you are planning and preparing for the next life adventure, that is, retirement; or, perhaps you are taking care of an aging relative who is anticipating such a change of life.  Either way, retirement is a major change of one’s lifestyle and requires thought and preparation.  While finances, insurance and healthcare are essential to a satisfying retirement, there are other aspects to consider.

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PARTNERING WITH YOUR DOCTOR

Monday, June 29, 2015 -- Caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease or a related form of dementia requires partnerships. Your primary partner is the person with a diagnosis. Early on in the course of the illness it is important to talk about the kind of care the person would like. It is important to know how to meet your loved one’s emotional, spiritual and physical needs. Take time to plan enjoyable activities together. Letting your loved one know that living with Alzheimer’s is something you will do together, may be the greatest gift you can give.

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BE INFORMED ABOUT HEART FAILURE

Monday, June 22, 2015 -- Nearly six million Americans currently live with heart failure, yet a recent national survey found potentially dangerous misconceptions and knowledge gaps about the disease.

Seventy percent of the respondents said they were aware of heart failure, but survey results showed many people, including patients and caregivers, have misunderstandings about the condition and its causes and symptoms. Fifty-eight percent of those surveyed mistook heart failure as a natural cause of death that occurs when the heart stops beating. Nearly half of the respondents incorrectly said heart failure is a silent killer with no symptoms.

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TRAVELING IS HEALTHY MEDICINE AT EASTWYCK VILLAGE

Wednesday, June 17, 2015 -- Seniors at Eastwyck Village are constantly on the go. And when they’re not taking a NIA exercise or aqua aerobics class, chances are they’re traveling the world or visiting loved ones around the country.

Just recently Alice Terwillegar and Sandy Purtell flew to Dallas, Texas to soak up the sights of The Lone Star State and spend time with family. Good friend and fellow resident Don Hempstead kindly loaded their bags and drove them to Albany International Airport.

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TIPS FOR THOSE WITH LOW VISION TO ADAPT TO THEIR ENVIRONMENT

Monday, June 8, 2015 -- The Eastwyck Low Vision Support Group met on Monday, June 1 and had a guest speaker, Nancy Ryan. Nancy is a licensed occupational therapist and certified low vision therapist providing one-on-one services to individuals with low vision. Many of her clients are referred to her by a physician and her services are then paid for through Medicare.

As Nancy’s specialty is occupational therapy and understanding vision loss, she has a unique skill set in helping people learn to maximize their abilities by making adaptive adjustments to their environment. Nancy meets with people in their homes and consults about lighting and making simple changes in the home to promote independent and safe living.

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JOIN THE 6/13 CAPITAL REGION HEART WALK!

Thursday, June 4, 2015 -- Did you know that one hour of exercise can extend your life by two hours? That’s about the best two-for-one deal going!

You can extend your life at the Capital Region Heart Walk on Saturday, June 13, at the Empire State Plaza. Registration for the Heart Walk starts at 9 a.m. and the 1-or 3-mile walk starts at 10 a.m. Every year, a business leader from the community volunteers to chair the Heart Walk. This year, that chair is Ray Rudolph, executive chairman of CHA in Albany.

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HOW TO DISCUSS VISION LOSS WITH OTHERS

Friday, May 8, 2015 -- The Eastwyck Low Vision Support Group met this week and discussed how members deal with explaining to strangers, friends and loved ones about their vision loss. All agreed that often times this conversation can be challenging, recognizing that it is difficult to explain what they can see and cannot see. 

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For many people who lose their vision later in life, it can be a difficult adjustment. Each person’s vision loss is different. Although it may be difficult, it is important to remain active and engaged in favorite activities. Friends and family members can be supportive by helping their visually impaired loved ones remain engaged and search out helpful resources. Sometimes this change is an opportunity to explore new activities that might be meaningful.

Because many people with vision impairment do not “look” like they have low vision, others with good vision often times forget that their friend has vision difficulty or maybe they don’t even know. Often times many find it difficult to ask another for help when they need it. Attendees discussed how important it is to advocate for themselves; helping others understand what they can and cannot see and what can be helpful for them. Helping others understand their vision limitations can help promote independence, as well as help others be appropriately supportive. Most people want to be helpful if they know what is needed.

Here are some thoughtful considerations for people with good vision when interacting with someone who has low vision:

  • Identify yourself. Don’t assume that a visually impaired person will recognize your voice.
  • If you would like to assist someone who is visually impaired, always ask first. They will let you know if your help would be appreciated.
  • If your assistance would be appreciated in traveling, offer your arm to escort them. Do not hold hands or push. And never touch a guide dog or a white cane.
  • Use the clock face as a reference to give a person orientation to things around them, on their plate of food or items on a table
  • Avoid unnecessary touching. Touching a person who cannot see/see very well can be disconcerting. Always announce what you would like to do, such as shaking a hand or giving a hug.

The Northeastern Association of the Blind at Albany(NABA) facilitates the monthly meetings and is available to provide suggestions and instruction about being thoughtful when interacting with someone who is blind or visually impaired. www.naba-vision.org

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The meeting closed with agreement that the next meeting will be June 1st at 1 p.m. The group will not meet in July and August. The public is welcome to join the meetings.

For more information about the Eastwyck Low Vision Support Group, contact Cheryl Lawyer, NABA Outreach Coordinator at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or (518) 463-1211.

 

DON’T JUST HOPE FOR A CURE. HELP US FIND ONE.

Monday, May 4, 2015 -- The Alzheimer's Association is committed to accelerating the global effort to eliminate Alzheimer's disease. We are the largest nonprofit funder of Alzheimer's research. We connect with scientific, academic, government and industry thought-leaders and key stakeholders worldwide. We believe in the value of collaboration and are a catalyst toward the time when we will have disease-modifying treatments, preventive strategies and gold-standard care for all people affected by Alzheimer's disease.

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MAY IS AMERICAN STROKE MONTH: DO YOU KNOW THE WARNING SIGNS?

Monday, April 27, 2015 -- If you’re like most Americans, you don’t know the signs of stroke.

Only eight percent of those recently surveyed in the American Stroke Association/Ad Council Stroke Awareness Continuous Tracking Study could identify each letter in F.A.S.T., an acronym of the most common stroke warning signs.

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